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someone invests in us because we have the technology leadership, it manifests itself in products that lead the competition and allows us to win in markets. >> perhaps it's time to ramp that spending up, jim, to figure out other avenues in which they'll be able to deploy their chips. >> they cut it to 12 billion because they were able to reuse some of the factories. the interesting thing is goldman is saying you're spending three times what you're spending in 2009 and getting the same bang for the buck. intel which is a fabulous manufacturer, is spending too much money and not getting any reward for it. they're paying good dividend while you're waiting. >> what are you waiting for? for ultra tablets? >> i think that comes out, gdot. it's not like they haven't figured out transitions in the past and what was the ability to do just that. >> ultimately, they've been able to reinvent and reinvent by making things smaller and smaller, another really nice guy, but this was supposed to be a good-bye swan song and instead it turned a rap on the call, i felt. i felt like people were saying gross mar
the impacts of extreme weather events, clean energy technologies and the threats of rising temperatures across the country. in contrast, we are not aware of any republican member who has spoken on the house floor about the dangers of climate change and the committee of jurisdiction is not even willing to hold a hearing to hear what the scientists and experts have to say about the issue. i have a message to house republicans, you can't make climate change go away by ignoring the problem. . . . the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington rise? mrs. mcmorris rodgers: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you, madam speaker. today, our hearts remain heavy -- our hearts are heavy for those who lost their lives on monday's unspeakable act of violence. for those who remain in critical condition, for the parents who lost their 8-year-old son, and for the families whose loved ones never came home from the boston marathon. while our sorrow is great, so, too, is o
streets, near schools, the only technology that should be near a child in a school is a computer and not a gun. especially the ones that have these kinds of magazines that really only belong on the battlefields of our country and may have been purchased in gun shows without crime cal background checks. i think you have to be able to work in a bipartisan fashion to put together the coalition that can successfully pass that kind of legislation. >> go ahead. >> in terms of the political tactics right now not working in washington, is there something you would do right now to change what is essentially a stalling of these political tactics? >> why don't you start, mr. lynch. >> if i could follow up. i think most people know my background. a few years back, more than a few years back my cousin brian was gunned down in the old colony housing project, next door where we grew up. i know what it's like to have a family member killed by gun violence. i think that far too many families in this country know that feeling. nd i know that there's a lot of -- there are a lot of families out ther
, in eastern colorado we have seen new technologies that can produce american resources, that must and have to be a part of an all-of-the-above, an all-american energy plan. an all-american energy plan that will rely on not somebody thousands of miles away from us, not on somebody overseas, but right in our own backyard. our neighborhoods -- our neighbors. maybe our family members. people in our communities who can produce the energy that we use each and every moment of our lives, to better the lives of our families, to create the next product that will ignite an entire economy. but we can't do that unless we have an affordable energy policy. and that's why an all-american energy plan is so important. and that's why it's an absolute and fundamental key to making life work for so many people across this country. what we can do with natural gas, a clean-burning fuel created right -- developed, extracted right in colorado, what we can do to use the oil, the wind power, the solar power that we are utilizing in colorado to make life work for families. and how does life work? i think we're all fa
. companies that are helping find oil, that have sophisticated technology in the oil service area. we think the overall market is really still in a secular trading range that it has been in for the last 13 years and up at the upper boup drills of that. liz: john, are you spooked at all what seems years ago and it was earlier this week, the gdp of china missed estimates? it was lower than expected growth? and you still believe in commodities why? because a lot of chinese still need to be fed and need to build skyscrapers? what is the your focus here? absolutely. 7.7% gdp growth is still history high for most economies. clearly a little slower than was expected. they're going through some growing pains right now as they sort of shift from being a totally export driven economy to seeing the middle class expand. china this decade will probably see a tripling of its middle class from about 14%, to 43%. and that's an extremely powerful event. it is historic. and it is going on in the rest of the emerging world as well. david: scott, let me bring it back home for a second if i can. i will read off
enhancement technology, mostly dprept sto from the department store, they clearly identified a suspect, a single suspect and an arrest has been made. a briefing scheduled for later this evening, obviously. >> so let's reset chronologically. do we know what point they wound up identifying somebody, do we know a time window? >> i can tell you i was on just before 10:00 last night with anderson cooper and an hour or so before that i talked to a boston source who said we're stymied at the moment. we're doing a great job with the forensics. we know how the bombs work. we know about their power. we have a very good idea of the timing obviously because of all of the video. the who part, this source said they were stymied, so clearly from yesterday evening to the overnight hours, in analyzing this additional video, they were all day yesterday canvassing through the neighborhood, it is a holiday, the stores were closed and on monday when this took place. they go in and say what do you got, and looking at reams of evidence and so many millions of frames of video and finally they got what they we
to science, technology, engineering and math? and i'm happy to have so many key members of my science team who are here today including my chief science adviser, john holder, who's here. there's john. nih director francis collins. there's francis right there, the tall guy. we've got acting director of the national science foundation, cora merit, there's cora, and we've got real life astronaut and nasa administrator charles bolton. where's charlie? there he is right there. we need to make in this a priority, train an army of new teachers in these subject areas and to make sure that all of us as a country are lifting up these subjects for the respect that that they deserve. you know, and one of the things i'm concerned about is that as a culture, you know, we're great consumers of technology, but we're not always properly respecting the people who are in the labs and, you know, behind the scenes creating the stuff that we now take for granted. and we've got to give the millions of americans who work in science and technology not only the kind of respect they deserve, but also new ways to eng
. i absolutely want to dance again. >> reporter: this doctor says modern prosthetic technology is so advanced, she will. so, doctor, a lot of victims are telling me, you know what, i will walk again. they can? >> they can. if they were walking before they had their amputation, we can have them walk again. much depends on the level of their amputation. and all of it depends on what their goals and objectives are. >> reporter: and we have seen just how impressive these prosthetics can be. our own diane sawyer, interviewed amy mullens, both her legs amputated as a young girl. she later not only competed in the paralympics, and became a model. whether dancing or running, the doctor says, modern prosthetic technology is so advanced, adrianne will get back on that dance floor. >> i just want people to know that you can come out of a situation that may seem like the end of the world and come out stronger. >> reporter: this dancer is determined, like the rest of the city, to get back on her feet again. gio benitez, abc news, boston. >> hers is just one of the many stories i know we are going
especially. they do have technology where they will swipe, they'll use a piece of cloth and they will swipe a bag or purse and then run a quick test on the residue. so that happens, but that is not done for every person entering the complex. that's done as in some airports just randomly. and apparently there was no reason for this man to be stopped according to those regular security procedures at the capitol. what really seemed to raise the alarm bells here is that he was able to deliver letters in person against protocol that somehow members of some senate offices accepted packages and letters in person that they should not have. and that word apparently got to capitol police in time for them to find this man here in the capitol complex in the heart building i'm told and stop him and they are now questioning him. >> i assume they'll be going through those suspicious envelopes in the backpack as well. standby, lisa desjardins is in the building being evacuated right now. dana bash is standing by. she's at the russell center office building. brianna keilar's at the white house. we're awaiti
by the rules supporting our farmers, and innovating for our technology companies, or creating businesses of their own. our nation continues to benefit from immigrants, as it did when my parents came here. we need to uphold the fundamental values of family, rd work, and fairness. in vermont, immigration has promoted cultural riches, refugee resettlement, student exchange. economic development to the five regional senate programs, tourism, and trade with our friends, in that wonderful country of canada. foreign agricultural workers support vermont farmers and growers, many of whom become part of families, woven into the fabric of vermont's ag consult -- agricultural community as they have in so many other states. the dysfunction of the system affects all of us. now is our time to fix it. this is our opportunity to do it. act deliberately, but we have to act. we can talk about it, but eventually, we have to vote. millions of people. millions of americans are depending upon us. senator grassley. >> yes. on this side, mr. chairman, we understand why the secretary can't be here and we feel she
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11